Spotlight the Label: USW

Spotlight the Label: USW

The United Steelworkers is North America’s largest industrial union, with 1.2 million mem-bers and retirees in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean. The Steelworkers first contract was signed in 1937 with Carnegie-Illinois Steel. Strikes, riots, and attacks on workers soon followed when the union began to organize workers at Bethlehem, Jones and Laughlin, National and other compa-nies. Ultimately, the Steelworkers prevailed in their struggle to organize these companies. The Steelworkers also have a presence in the United Kingdom, Ireland, England, Scotland, Mexico and many other places around the world, where they fight for a better life for all...
Spotlight the Label: Allied Printing Trades Council

Spotlight the Label: Allied Printing Trades Council

Look for and ask for the International Allied Printing Trades Council label—the familiar “bug”—on all printed material. The bug is your assurance of quality and craftsmanship. The bug also guar-antees that the men and women who work on your printed materials receive decent wages and benefits in plants that practice responsible labor-management relations. The label must include the city name and number identifying the exact union printing plant where the work was produced. The Allied Printing Trades Council is made up of the Printing, Publishing, and Media Workers Sector (PPMWS) of the Communications Workers of America and the Graphic Communications Conference (GCC) a division of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. Both the GCC and the PPMWS have distinct labels identifying the shop at which the materials were printed....
Spotlight the Label: AFSCME

Spotlight the Label: AFSCME

Started in 1932, when a group of white collar professional state employees met in Madison, Wisconsin, and created the Wisconsin State Employees Union, AFSCME has grown into the nation’s largest and fastest growing public services employees union with more than 1.6 million working and retired members. AFSCME’s members provide the vital services that make America happen. They are nurses, corrections officers, child care providers, EMTs, sanitation workers and more. With members in hundreds of different occupations, AFSCME advocates for fairness in the workplace, excellence in public services and prosperity and opportunity for all working...
Spotlight the Label: IBEW

Spotlight the Label: IBEW

The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) represents more than 750,000 workers in the electrical industry in the United States, Canada, Panama and several Caribbean island nations; particularly electricians, or Inside Wiremen, in the construction industry and linemen and other employees of public utilities. The union also represents some workers in the computer, telecommunications, broadcasting, and other fields related to electrical work. The union was founded in 1891 shortly after homes and businesses in the United States began receiving electricity. In September 1941, the National Apprenticeship Standards for the Electrical Construction Industry, a joint effort among the IBEW, the National Electrical Contractors Association, and the Federal Committee on Apprenticeship, were established. The IBEW added additional training programs and courses as needed to keep up with new technologies, including an industrial electronics course in 1959 and an industrial nuclear power course in 1966. Today, the IBEW conducts apprenticeship programs for electricians, linemen, and VDV (voice, data, and video) installers (who install low-voltage wiring such as computer networks), in conjunction with the National Electrical Contractors Association, under the auspices of the National Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee (NJATC), which allows apprentices to “earn while you...
Spotlight on the Label–AWIU

Spotlight on the Label–AWIU

Spotlight the Label: AWIU formerly Asbestos Workers The International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and Allied Workers (AWIU or Insulators) is a trade unionin the United Statesand Canada. It is affiliated with the AFL–CIOand the Canadian Labour Congress. The union was formerly known as the International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and Asbestos Workers, but the name was changed to reflect a symbolic new direction away from the hazards of exposure to asbestos. One of the major jobs of the members of the union has long been the safe removal of hazardous asbestos-containing materials, which were previously used in many construction products, such as insulation, adhesives, caulks, and flooringtiles. Ever wondered why the Insulators use a salamander in their logo? According to the Western Lake Erie Insulation Industry website the salamander is associated with its unique ability to live in fire. The AWIU adopted the salamander from the beginning as part of its logo because of the fire-resistant...

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